Reuniting Product Management and Lean UX

flux capacitor - a back to the future moment

(This is a guest post by Rich Mironov, who coaches product executive and product management/owner teams. He wrote The Art of Product Management. You can find Rich on Twitter, LinkedIn or on his blog.)

I was at a recent Lean Startup Circle talk about the future of product management. It was a "back to the future" moment for me, hearing about the need for the strong strategic product management that predates Lean and Agile. A return to first principles, but with more build-measure-learn.

everyone knows someone who needs a kick in the ass

Selling a Kick in the Ass

(This is part of a series of posts about testing product/market fit. You can download the Product/Market Fit Storyboard here.)

Back to the basics.

"Everyone" is not our customer.

Neither are "Consumers" or "SMBs."

Unless the problem we are solving is death, not everyone wants our solution.

Even then, not everyone wants our Grim-Reaper-Be-Gone!™ Spray. Some people just want to check out this of this madhouse.

(In case you were thinking it, taxes aren't a problem for everyone either.)

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Minimum Viable Lemonade

User Experience is Not a Feature

Is anyone else out there sick of signing up for on-line products that don't do what they promised?

Or more commonly, products that don't actually do anything?

Seems like every day I'm running into another landing page which requires access to all my social networks, yet provides no actual value.

Minimum Viable Product

I am a huge fan of creating Minimum Viable Products (MVPs) in order to test business ideas. I advocate it on a daily basis because too many people build too many products that no one is really interested in using. A minimum viable product is a great way to test customer interest in your solution and figure out the minimum feature set that you can build a business around.

However, even if you're running a basic smoke test just to see if anyone will sign up for your business idea, "It's only an MVP" is a poor excuse for bad user experience.

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